Amos n’ Andy: Anatomy of a Controversy

The CBS series is taken off the air in 1953 because of protests from civil rights groups; host George Kirby.

Adapted to television, The Amos ‘n Andy Show was produced from 1951 to 1953 with 78 filmed episodes. The TV series used African-American actors in the main roles, although the actors were instructed to keep their voices and speech patterns as close to Gosden and Correll’s as possible.

Selling Some Soap



Amazon gives me $2 to get you to try the Amazon Prime service free for a month. I could use the $2. I use this myself.

Join Amazon Prime - Watch Over 40,000 Movies & TV Shows Anytime - Start Free Trial Now

The other bounty I get from Amazon is a buck if I can get you to download their free book reader. This shouldn't confront you at all. It's just a book reader. A pretty nice one actually.

Amazon.com - Read eBooks using the FREE Kindle Reading App on Most Devices

5 thoughts on “Amos n’ Andy: Anatomy of a Controversy”

  1. thanks for posting this. as a child i wasn’t allowed to watch amos n andy. in the 70′s i was able to get the entire series, and i thoroughly enjooyed it. episodes are available on youtube. while i sympathized, as a black person with the point of view of naacp, may black actgors were thrown out of work with the ending of this great series.

  2. I myself thought Amos and Andy was great whether black or white characters I’m pretty old but not to old to remember when tv was all we had.I’m glad that I was around.Not to mention another great show The Honeymooners with Jackie Gleason and Audrey Hepburn now those was the days.

  3. As a child, I remember watching Amos n Andy with my father laughing beside me. I never liked The Honeymooners (couldn’t stand Gleason’s charactor), nor did I care for I Love Lucy (Lucial Ball can drive me up a tree faster than Gleason can say “To the mooon, Alice!”). But dad & I loved Laural & Hardy, W.C. Fields, and Amos N Andy. It’s sad that anyone would think that one show stereo-typed a people when you consider the company they kept.

  4. Being white and growing up in an all white neighborhood, watching Amos n Andy gave me a feeling/understanding that black people were not the enemy, that they made me laugh and were not to fear in any way. I personally don’t think this was detrimental to black people in that it showed characters of different levels of intelligence and success, a cab driver, an attorney, etc. and it certainly entertained a little white girl once upon a time.

  5. I don’t think this should have been a point of contention. Amos and Andy weren’t any sillier or dumber than the Great Gildersleeve, the Life of Riley… etc..

    Maybe the Irish should be upset? Still, if it upsets people or hurts anybody’s feelings.. that shouldn’t really be a controversy… Maybe the controversy points out that we should be nicer to each other and weren’t.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current day month ye@r *