Horror

the_omen_1976_4 Horror

Omen, The (1976)

The Omen is a 1976 American-British supernatural horror film directed by Richard Donner and written by David Seltzer. The film stars Gregory Peck, Lee Remick, David Warner, Harvey Spencer Stephens, Billie Whitelaw, Patrick Troughton, Martin Benson, and Leo McKern. The first installment in The Omen series, the film centres a young child adopted by American Ambassador Robert Thorn alongside with his wife. Surrounded by mysterious ominous deaths, they are unaware that the child is the Antichrist.

ghoul Horror

Ghoul, The (1933)

Here’s a better than fair Boris Karloff movie about an Egyptologist that comes back from the dead to take revenge.

Moon-Of-The-Wolf-photo-1 Free Classic Movies

Moon of the Wolf (1972)

The film begins following a moonlit night in the Louisiana Bayou town of Marsh Island as two farmers discover the mauled, dead body of a local resident, an attractive young girl. Sheriff Aaron Whitaker (David Janssen) is called in. The victim’s temperamental brother Lawrence Burrifors (Geoffrey Lewis) arrives at the crime scene and jumps to the conclusion that the girl’s lover committed the murder, a man whose very name her brother does not know. The town’s Dr. Drutan (John Beradino) examines the body and pronounces the girl died of a severe blow to the head caused by a human hand. He tells Sheriff Whitaker, “It looks like you have a murder on your hands.” The sheriff replies, “Just what I needed.”

hqdefault Horror

Children of the Corn (1983)

“Children of the Corn” is a short story by Stephen King, first published in the March 1977 issue of Penthouse, and later collected in King’s 1978 collection Night Shift. The story involves a couple’s exploration of a strange town and their encounters with its denizens after their vacation is sidelined by a car accident. Several films have been adapted from the short story and it spawned a horror franchise beginning in 1984.

The_Crimson_Ghost_poster Horror

Crimson Ghost, The (1937)

The Crimson Ghost (1946) is a Republic film serial directed by Fred C. Brannon and William Witney with Charles Quigley and Linda Stirling playing the leads. This was Witney’s last serial, after a career that left him one of the most praised of all serial directors. The serial was re-released as a six-episode television series in the 1950s and as a television film called Cyclotrode “X” in 1966.