Tag Archives: TV Shows

Classic TV shows with some things that are up to date too. Full episodes.


Mr. Ed (1961-62)

Mister Ed is a palomino horse who can talk and and his owner. Ed gets his owner the reputation of being a troublemaker with his antics.


I Love Lucy (1951-1957)

Lucy! You got some splainin to do… CBS posted these episodes of I Love Lucy, which details the adventures of Lucy, Little Ricky, and Ricky Ricardo. It originally ran from October 15, 1951, to May 6, 1957, on CBS. In 2007 it was listed as one of Time magazine’s “100 Best TV Shows of All-TIME.”


Gunsmoke (1955-75)

Gunsmoke had a twenty year TV run with William Conrad as the sheriff of dodge city. The early episodes are perhaps more somber, serious and gritty than the ones that came after. It seems that there was a brief trend in television in the late 50’s and early 60’s to make some television with really serious topics. It almost seems out of place and Gunsmoke remains relevant 50 years later.


Father Ted (1995)

A little off color and ignoring the British laugh track, I thought this BBC series about three priests exiled to remote Craggy Island, somewhere east of Ireland, was kind of entertaining. This gets a mature rating for having off color language, but really not much.


Lou Grant – Christmas (1977)

Two stories — one on a homeless family, and one on a politician — take unexpected turns. Season One, Episode 13 of the Lou Grant show, starring Ed Asner. This was a spinoff of the Mary Tyler Moore show.


Mary Tyler Moore Show-Christmas and the Hard Luck Kid (1970)

Mary’s elaborate holiday plans are cancelled when she learns she must work on Christmas Day.


Damo (2003)

This is a fairy tale, mixed with Kung Fu, romance, serious subjects and a little slapstick comedy that usually looks like a training session at the Bejing Circus school. It’s not oversexed, overly violent, or gory. It’s fun.


American Experience: The Great Famine (2011)

In the wake of World War I, there was an American relief effort organized by Herbert Hoover to save the starving Russians. This makes Herbert Hoover the man who saved the most lives of anyone in history. The Great Famine is a documentary about the worst natural disaster in Europe since the Black Plague in the Middle Ages. Five million Soviet citizens died. Half a world away, Americans responded with a massive two-year relief campaign, championed by Herbert Hoover, director of the American Relief Administration.


Young Riders, The (1989-92)

Saddle up for fun and adventure with “The Young Riders.” Set in the early days of the Pony Express, the series tells the fictionalized story of a group of young riders for the express in Sweetwater, Kansas, who just happen to include a couple of dudes who would one day go down in real-life history as two of the west’s most notorious names: “Buffalo Bill” Cody (Stephen Baldwin) and “Wild Bill” Hickock (Josh Brolin). In charge of the bunch is ex-Texas ranger and all-around eccentric teaspoon hunter (Anthony Zerbe).


My Mother the Car (1965)

Lawyer Dave Crabtree’s troubles begin with the purchase of a decrepit 1928 Porter that claims through the radio to be his mother. Starring Jerry Van Dyke.


Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (1964-68)

Irwin Allens show based on the 1961 film of the same name. Both were created by Irwin Allen, which enabled the movie’s sets, costumes, props, special effects models, and sometimes footage, to be used in the production of the television series. Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea was the first of Irwin Allen’s four science fiction television series. The show’s main theme was underwater adventure.


Nova: Secrets of Lost Empires II – Easter Island (2008)

Travel to Easter Island to discover the secrets of this vanished civilization through the “moai,” the massive headstones that these ancient islanders created to achieve peace and harmony, yet resulted in geological disaster.