Westerns

Abilene Town (1946)


In the years following the Civil War, Kansas is in the middle of a difficult time. homesteaders are moving into the west, trying to start new lives, and are going head to head against cattlemen who have been settled in that territory for years. In Abilene, one of the biggest cattle towns of the west, the town is on the brink of a confrontation between the cattlemen and the homesteaders.

Aces and Eights (1936)


Tim McCoy plays Gentleman Jim Madigan, a professional gambler that comes to the aid of a Mexican family. Tim McCoy was interesting in real life. He was a famous Hollywood star, but he also was really fast at quick draw and was an expert on Old West and Indian folklore.

American West of John Ford, The (1971)


John Wayne, James Stewart, Henry Fonda and Andy Devine star in this documentary about filmmaking legend John Ford. In a career that spanned more than 50 years, Ford directed 140 films (although nearly all of his silent films are now lost) and he came to be regarded as one of the finest American filmmakers of his generation. Ford’s films and personality have been highly influential, leading colleagues such as Ingmar Bergman and Orson Welles to name him as one of the greatest directors of all time.

Angel and the Badman (1946)


This is one of my favorite John Wayne Movies. Quirt Evans gets introduced to Quakers, who take him in after he gets shot over a land deal. He likes the Quakers, especially the farmers daughter played by Gail Russell.

Arizona Gunfighter (1937)


Get out the soda pop and the bubble gum for this Saturday Afternoon Bob Steele western. Bob Steele goes after the gang that killed his father.

Big Trees, The (1954)


In 1900, lumberman Jim Fallon (Kirk Douglas) greedily eyes the big trees in the virgin region of northern California. The land is already settled by, among others, a religious group led by Elder Bixby (Charles Meredith). Jim is attracted to Bixby’s daughter, Alicia (Eve Miller), though that does not change his plan to cheat the homesteaders.

Blue Steel (1934)


Blue Steel is a 1934 Western film in which John Wayne plays a U.S. Marshal who is trying to capture the Polka Dot Bandit, who has taken off with $4,000.

Bonanza – The Bloodline (1960)


Luke Grayson forces Ben Cartwright to kill him in self defense. Grayson’s son Luke shows up and wants revenge on Ben and is backed up by a hired gun and a saloon girl.

Call of the Wilderness (1932)


This movie is also known as “Trailing the Killer”. Plain and simple this is a dog movie in the character of Rin-Tin-Tin. Caesar is as smart as Rinty.

Carson City Kid, The (1940)


Roy Rogers, playing a character named Roy Rogers, while not being himself; posing as The Carson City Kid, is seeking vengeance on Morgan Reynolds, the man who killed his brother.

Dawn Rider, The (1935)


Here’s another Lone Star Picture with John Wayne. John Wayne goes after the guys that killed his dad.

Death Rides a Horse (1967)


Here’s a 1967 spaghetti western with Lee Van Cleef and John Phillip Law. Bill Meceita, a boy whose family was murdered in front of him by a gang, sets out 15 years later to exact revenge. On his journey, he finds himself continually sparring and occasionally cooperating with Ryan, a gunfighter on his own quest for vengeance, who knows more than he says about Bill’s tragedy.

Desert Trail, The (1935)


Rodeo star John Scott (John Wayne) and his gambler friend Kansas Charlie (Eddy Chandler) are wrongly accused of armed robbery at the Rattlesnake Gulch rodeo just after John Scott gets his rodeo prize money. The Rodeo Official is robbed and murdered by Pete (Paul Fix) a minute after Scott and Kansas Charlie leave.

Drifter, The (1932)


The Drifter is a vaudevillian drama about a man who returns from prison to get tangled up in a lot of intrigue with the shady characters around him.

Gods Gun (1975)


Father John (Lee Van Cleef) turns vigilante and hunts down a gang of criminals, led by Sam Clayton (Jack Palance) who kill the local priest.

Gone with the West (1975)


James Caan (Jud McGraw) and Stefanie Powers (Little Moon) have one thing in common. They hate this little town they came across. Sammy Davis Jr. didn’t like it much either.

Great Dan Patch, The (1949)


This movie stars Dennis O’Keefe and Gail Russell. It’s the true story about Dan Patch, who held the record for being the fastest harness horse in the world from 1909 to 1938.

Greyeagle (1977)


This is fair formula western, sort of a remake of “The Searchers”. A tough frontier (Jack Elam) trapper tracks the young Cheyenne warrior who kidnapped his daughter (Lana Wood).

Gunsmoke (1955-75)


Gunsmoke had a twenty year TV run with William Conrad as the sheriff of dodge city. The early episodes are perhaps more somber, serious and gritty than the ones that came after. It seems that there was a brief trend in television in the late 50′s and early 60′s to make some television with really serious topics. It almost seems out of place and Gunsmoke remains relevant 50 years later.

Gunsmoke Ranch (1937)


The Three Mesquiteers protect settlers against an evil politician trying to steal their land after a flood. Starring Ray Corrigan, Max Terhune and Robert Livingston.

Haunted Ranch (1943)


The Range Busters take on Rance and his outlaw gang over a shipment of gold bullion. Rance has his men impersonating ghosts to keep people away from the ranch where he suspects the gold is hidden.

It Can Be Done Amigo (1972)


Bud Spencer plays Hiram Coburn ; a drifter. Jack Palance plays Sunny ; a gunfighter who wants him to marry his sister. A little boy (Renato Cestie) and Jack Palances gun save him from hanging, but the boys uncle gets killed so Bud Spencer adopts the waif. I don’t want to give away too much on the plot, but the interaction between Palance and Bud Spencer is pretty funny.

Law of the West (1932)


Lightnin Bill Carson (1936)


Bill Carson (Tim McCoy) finds out that the sheriff and his men hung the wrong man for holding up the stage.

Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold (1958)


Long Ride Home, The (2003)


Jack Fowler (Randy Travis) was mistaken as a cold-blooded killer. Now he must find the real murderer before a blood-thirsty posse hangs him for a crime he didn’t commit. Set in the old West in the late 1860s, The Long Ride Home also stars Eric Roberts and Ernest Borgnine.

Lucky Texan, The (1934)


John Wayne stars in this western movie about two ranchers who strike it rich with a gold mine and the bad guys that want the gold.

Mad Dog Morgan (1976)


In the autumn of 1865 the unique and notorious desperado, bushranger Dan Morgan (Dennis Hopper), crossed the Murray River from New South Wales into Victoria to do battle with the law for the last time. Rated R.

McLintock! (1963)


McLintock! is a 1963 comedy Western starring John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara, and loosely based on Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew. The film is famous (or infamous) for its two spanking scenes, in which mother and daughter are each paddled with coal shovels: the daughter by her suitor, the mother by her estranged husband.

Mohawk (1956)


An artist working in a remote army post is juggling the storekeeper’s daughter, his fiancée newly arrived from the east, and the Indian Chief’s daughter. But when a vengeful settler manages to get the army and the braves at each other’s throats his troubles really begin.

Nevada Buckaroo, The (1931)


When the Buck Hurley (Bob Steele) gets caught in a stage robbery, the gang leader Cherokee (George Hayes) gets him released. It’s cowboy love. When a stage he’s on gets robbed, the sheriff thinks Cherokee is in on the robbery and Buck gets busted breaking him out of jail.

Nevadan, The (1950)


Randolph Scott, Dorothy Malone and Forrest Tucker tell the tale of the mysterious stranger who tangles with evil ranchers and bank robbers.

No Man’s Range (1935)


Bob Steele and Fuzzy are summoned to the Oliver ranch to help them fight a range war.

Proud and the Damned, The (1972)


A group of five Confederate mercenaries led by Sergeant Will Hansen must choose sides carefully in a small village where they find themselves trapped in the middle of a rebellion. Starring Chuck Connors and Cesar Romero.

Rage at Dawn (1955)


Four of the Reno brothers are outlaws. One is a respected farmer. It’s the biggest double-cross in Western history. Randolph Scott is a secret agent sent to bring the Reno brothers and their conspirators to justice.

Riders of Destiny (1933)


Here John Wayne plays Singin’ Sandy Saunders, the screen’s first singing cowboy. Singin’ Sandy’s ten-gallon hat was black instead of white. This movie is a little more intense than your normal musical cowbody movie of the time. Sandy says “the streets soon running with blood” and “you’ll be drinking your drinks with the dead”, which in not the tamest John Wayne of the 1930′s.

Riders of the Sage (1939)


Here’s a good old fashioned Bob Steele western. Meanwhile back at the ranch, kidnappers have grabbed Tom Martin so his dad Jim will sell out. It’s Riders of the Sage to the rescue.

Rifleman, The – Mail Order Groom (1958)


Miss Isabelle sent off for a new husband named Mr. Jupiter. A mail order husband. She’s afraid the local riff raff is gonna bother him. Not too Much.

Roarin’ Guns (1936)


Tim McCoy plays a hired gunman Rancher Morgan hired in response to a range war. The leading lady was a woman named Rosalinda Price. It was her only movie.

Stagecoach (1939)


This is where it all started. John Ford’s smash hit and enduring masterpiece Stagecoach revolutionized the western, elevating it from B movie to the A-list and establishing the genre as we know it today. The quintessential tale of a group of strangers thrown together into extraordinary circumstances, Stagecoach features outstanding performances from Hollywood stalwarts Claire Trevor, John Carradine, and Thomas Mitchell, and, of course, John Wayne, in his first starring role for Ford, as the daredevil outlaw the Ringo Kid. Superbly shot and tightly edited, Stagecoach (Ford’s first trip to Monument Valley) is Hollywood storytelling at its finest.

Star Packer, The (1934)


U.S. Marshal John Travers (John Wayne), becomes sheriff of a town where several murders have occurred, hoping to flush out an outlaw chieftain known only as “The Shadow”.

Straight Shooter (1939)


Here’s another Tim McCoy western. Martin hid a half a million dollars in government bonds on his ranch before someone did him in. Inspector Carson (Tim McCoy) must capture the murderer and recover the bonds.

Texas Terror, The – John Wayne (1935)


Sheriff John Higgins quits and goes into prospecting after he thinks he has killed his best friend in shooting it out with robbers. He encounters his dead buddy’s sister and helps her run her ranch. Then she finds out about his past.

Two Fisted Law (1932)


This is from when John Wayne wasn’t a star yet. Tim McCoy was. Rancher Tim Clark borrows money from Bob Russell, who then rustles Clark’s cattle so he will be unable to repay the money. Thus Russell is able to cheat Clark out of his ranch. Clark becomes a prospector for silver and ultimately comes to settle accounts with Russell and crooked deputy Bendix.

Vengeance Valley (1951)


This is sort of a Cain and Abel story about a rancher (Burt Lancaster) that takes in an orphaned boy. His real son gets jealous and tries to get his adopted brother in trouble, so that he can get the whole ranch.

War of the Wildcats (1943)


In Old Oklahoma (re-issue title is War of the Wildcats) John Wayne fights it out over some oil leases and a woman.

Western Cyclone (1943)


Randall (Glenn Strange) is trying to get the Governor (Karl Hackett) impeached so he can take over control of the state.
Knowing the Governor and Billy (Buster Crabbe) are good friends, he has Billy framed for murder.
Fuzzy (Al St. John) finds the shell and Billy sees it has a peculiar mark.
Now they have to find the owner of that gun.

White Comanche (1968)


Have you ever wondered how hungry William Shatner must have been after Star Trek? This movie answers that question! Please Bill, don’t kill me for showing this one. Here William Shatner plays Johnny Moon, the good cowboy. He also plays Notah, his evil Comanche half-brother, who eats peyote and enjoys rape, plunder and pillage. They meet for the final showdown in Rio Hondo.

Wildfire (1945)


It was a cold wet night, cattle rustlers were on the loose, the sheep were nervous. The sheep were always nervous, but this time it was because of cattle rustlers, not that other thing. In rides the handsome stranger played by Bob Steele to save the day.

Winds of the Wasteland (1936)


John Wayne plays John Blair. He and his partner, Larry Adams (Lane Chandler) are out of work when the arrival of telegraph ends the Pony Express. They get swindled by Cal Drake for a telegraph line and equipment to a ghost town. John determines that he will operate the line and learns that a coach race will be staged and he signs up for it. The fastest team in the race will win a $25,000 government contract.

Young Riders, The (1989-92)


Saddle up for fun and adventure with “The Young Riders.” Set in the early days of the Pony Express, the series tells the fictionalized story of a group of young riders for the express in Sweetwater, Kansas, who just happen to include a couple of dudes who would one day go down in real-life history as two of the west’s most notorious names: “Buffalo Bill” Cody (Stephen Baldwin) and “Wild Bill” Hickock (Josh Brolin). In charge of the bunch is ex-Texas ranger and all-around eccentric teaspoon hunter (Anthony Zerbe).

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